Posts tagged #children

Make March Matter for Children: The Case for High-Quality Early Education in Virginia

 
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The Problem

Every year, many children in our region and state enter kindergarten ready to fail. It will be tough for them to catch up without intervention.

In 2018, 42% of kindergarten students in participating school divisions of the Virginia Kindergarten Readiness Program entered kindergarten not ready in one of the critical learning domains of literacy, math, self-regulation or social skills. 

The Solution

High quality early education can close the achievement and readiness gaps.

The New E3 School is a state-of-the-art school in the Park Place neighborhood of Norfolk for children ages one to five. Our innovative mixed-income model focuses on the ingredients of high quality that lead to kindergarten readiness. The STREAMin3 curriculum developed by UVA’s Center for Advanced Study of Teaching & Learning (CASTL) includes:

·         Curriculum focused on the five core skills (relate, regulate, think, communicate, and move) and six STREAM skills (science, technology, reading, engineering, arts and math)

·         Professional development to support teachers’ understanding of child development

·         Coaching to improve teaching and learning in the classroom

·         Assessments of children’s skills and classroom quality

The STREAMin3 model is being piloted in 100 classrooms (private, faith-based, the Virginia Preschool Initiative and Head Start) across the state.

The New E3 School is a demonstration model that proves high quality results in kindergarten readiness. The school is advancing early education and impacting children in the region and across Virginia.

The Results

Four-year-old children from The New E3 School were assessed in 2017 and 2018 on their readiness to enter kindergarten. Most children met or exceeded the kindergarten entry benchmarks for literacy, math, and self-regulation. Some children did not meet the benchmark for social skills.

How You Can Help

Contribute to our scholarship fund! We believe every child deserves a high quality early education. Your gift will provide the opportunity for a low-income child to attend The New E3 School.

$50,000: provides a scholarship for a child to attend the school for five years.

$10,000: provides a scholarship for a child to attend the school for one year.

$2k-$5k: provides a partial scholarship for a child.

$500-$1k: provides financial assistance to a low- or middle-income family.

Small Children Have Big Feelings

Be a “feelings detective”

Parents and caregivers can learn a lot about their child by watching them from birth. What makes them anxious? How often do they get hungry? Are they fussier when they’re tired? It helps to learn your child’s patterns, and to imagine what they might be feeling. In a challenging situation, you might try asking yourself, “What else could be going on here?” This can help you respond calmly and consistently to their needs. Small children have big feelings.

Be kind to yourself

It’s easier to be loving and patient when a child is smiling and playing than when they’re crying or being demanding. But difficult behaviors are a typical part of early childhood, and it’s natural for parents to have all kinds of feelings about these challenges. Respect your feelings, make sure your child is safe, and let yourself take a break if you need to regain your cool. When you can calm yourself during challenging times, you’re letting your baby know they can rely on you to help them manage their own emotions.

Build a toolbox together

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As your child develops, you can teach them to recognize their feelings by naming them, such as “It’s frustrating when you can’t get what you want”, or “It can get so boring when you have to wait”. You can also help them identify simple choices they can make to feel better, such as “Let’s wait our turn by playing with these blocks instead”, or “Let’s sing a song while we wait”. Offering alternatives helps them learn to express themselves in better ways that will serve them throughout life.

Read more from Talking is Teaching.